Partnership Continues

As forests in our region are continuously logged and cleared for agricultural and developmental purposes, we start questioning how the forest animals will keep mobile without forested areas. Where shall the jaguars, ocelots, peccaries, deer and armadillos walk?

ERI and the Central Belize Wildlife Corridor on Fire

The Environmental Research Institute (ERI) was launched in January 2010. Now after four years of hard work and dedication the ERI continues growing and blooming with the third week of February being nothing short of transformational! We were joined by special visitors from our partner organizatio...

UB-ERI Additional Building Inauguration

Published February 27th 2014. The University of Belize - Environmental Research Institute (UB-ERI), launched in January 2010, was created  primarily to address the large gap in local capacity for research and monitoring that exists within Belize. Now  after over four years of hard work and dedica...

  • Partnership Continues

    Thursday, 14 August 2014 12:11
  • ERI and the Central Belize Wildlife Corridor on Fire

    Friday, 14 March 2014 10:27
  • UB-ERI Additional Building Inauguration

    Thursday, 27 February 2014 08:55
Partnership Continues

As forests in our region are continuously logged and cleared for agricultural and developmental purposes,
we start questioning how the forest animals will keep mobile without forested areas. Where shall the jaguars,
ocelots, peccaries, deer and armadillos walk?
Read more...
 
Training for PAM

The National Training Program for Protected Areas Management (NTPPAM) is a program dedicated to develop
and enhance the sustainable management of Belize’s National Protected Areas System as envisioned in the
National Protected Area System Plan. With funding from PACT and the program  managed by the University
of Belize Environmental Research Institute, Year 2 of the 2-year program kicked off this year with the 1st of
four courses.

Read more...
 
Are Jaguars Heading North?

Of the five native species of big cats prowling the Belizean jungle, it is the elusive and magnificent jaguar that
many tourists hope to see when they visit Belize. Only a lucky few visitors and locals have actually seen one
of these beautiful felines in the wild. Because of its sensitivity to humans, theses cats can be an effective
indicator for monitoring the integrity of core areas for wildlife corridor identification and conservation. Some
protected areas remain susceptible to uncontrolled human activities and this can be detrimental for jaguar
populations. Securing existing strongholds such as Belize’s biological corridors help safeguard the cat’s future.

North of Belize, the Wildlife Conservation Society is developing a survey and monitoring protocol for jaguars in
the North-Western Recovery Unit (NRU) for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This is a 220,000 km² area
which extends from west-central Mexico into the United States and contains an abundance of these beautiful
creatures.  The draft protocol provides an overview of the latest developments in methods and approaches
that may be used to tailor a design for the ecosystems of the NRU, while being relevant to large jaguar
landscapes and connecting terrains in general, such as the Central Belize Wildlife Corridor.

Read more...
 
National Training Program for Protected Areas Management

 

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The National Training Program for Protected Areas Management (NTPPAM) is a program dedicated to
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Of the five native species of big cats prowling the Belizean jungle, it is the elusive and

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